• Fourth Wall

    Fourth Wall

    2012
    10 x 13.3 x 8 feet

    Installation shot from solo exhibition at Roberts & Tilton. Inspired by image in the New York Times of a home in North Carolina that had had its roof blown off and front wall blown down by a tornado. Inspired also by the Modernist question of shape as form. While making this work, the artist also studied space on a smaller scale in the series Negative Space. 


    Unique chromogenic photograms from constructed negatives; Mounted to shaped board
  • Freeway Collapse

    Freeway Collapse

    2007
    Three 13 ½ foot x 30 inch panels

    Installation shot from the Centre d’Art Contemporain, Part Saint-Léger, France, 2008



    Archival Pigment Prints from constructed negatives
  • Good Sign

    Good Sign

    2013
    75.125 round and 72.5 x 148.25 and 40.25 x 103.375 inch banners from photograms

    Made in collaboration with JobCorps Flint as a part of the Flint Public Art Project in an effort to bring attention to underused sites in Flint, Michigan. Installed in abandoned signage that served as an armature for the work.




  • Ringtan

    Ringtan

    2007
    7 x 5 inches

    Ringtan was made concurrently with The Kitchen, as the artist considered the losses potential in domestic space. She hired a wedding photographer to photograph her hand as if she were proudly wearing an engagement ring, and even had French nails done. All that was left of her engagement ring, however, was the tan line it left behind.



    Archival inkjet print
  • Rock, Paper, Scissors

    Rock, Paper, Scissors

    2013

    Installation at the Orange County Museum of Art for the California-Pacific Triennial

    In considering the space of a museum, the artist decided to install a ruin comprised of hundreds of individual photograms that would appear to be rocks. These photograms were made by casting light through ice, and led also to the artist's work in the Slips and Pushes series.

     



    Unique chromogenic photograms of ice, silhouetted
  • Rock, Paper, Scissors, detail

    Rock, Paper, Scissors, detail

    2013

    Installation at the Orange County Museum of Art for the California-Pacific Triennial

    In considering the space of a museum, the artist decided to install a ruin comprised of hundreds of individual photograms that would appear to be rocks. These photograms were made by casting light through ice, and led also to the artist's work in the Slips and Pushes series.

     



    Unique chromogenic photograms of ice, silhouetted
  • Shipping Container

    Shipping Container

    2008
    8 x 8 x 20 feet

    Installation shot from Sandroni Rey, Los Angeles

    Shipping Container is a piece conceived as a response to the object that is a commercial gallery’s shipping container and to its situation as an exhibition space—removed from its intended environment and purpose. Using large-scale photograms from resin casts of shipping container siding, mounted within a steel frame custom built to fit the interior space of the container, the artist hoped to provoke a tension between the pictorial surface of a photograph and the three-dimensional space re-cast as a frame.

     



    Unique chromogenic photograms from constructed negatives, resin, steel, fluorescent lights on motion sensor
  • Sitting With Audrey

    Sitting With Audrey

    2007
    96 x 50 inch

    Portrait of a young woman, Audrey Wollen, modeled after a Jil Sander ad campaign and including in its installation the bench upon which Audrey sat for her portrait so that viewers can sit with Audrey as well.



    Unique chromogenic photogram on poplar frame with plywood bench
  • Souvenir

    Souvenir

    2009
    Each approximately 15 x 31 inches

    Made in residence at the Wende Museum and Archive of the Cold War.

    Included in Charlotte Cotton's book, Photography is Magic, Aperture 2015.

     


    Unique chromogenic photogram from trace of fragment of the Berlin Wall; five prints in colors derived from graffiti on original fragment
  • Souvenir

    Souvenir

    2009
    Each approximately 15 x 31 inches

    Made in residence at the Wende Museum and Archive of the Cold War.

    Included in Charlotte Cotton's book, Photography is Magic, Aperture 2015.

     



    Unique chromogenic photogram from trace of fragment of the Berlin Wall; five prints in colors derived from graffiti on original fragment
  • Strawberry Blonde

    Strawberry Blonde

    2010
    28 x 10 feet

    Commission for foyer of Richard Meier & Partners construction, Beverly Hills, CA, in dialogue with a growing tree outside the window and the horizontals and verticals of the space itself.



    Unique chromogenic photograms on aluminum
  • Street Photograph

    Street Photograph

    2008
    Dimensions variable

    Inspired by the notion of the street photograph throughout photographic history: how would the artist, given her evolving understanding of photography as having sculptural capabilities, remake the street photograph now?



    Unique silver gelatin photograms from constructed negatives, streetlamp, plywood
  • The Kitchen and Its Negative

    The Kitchen and Its Negative

    2008
    Each 8 x 12 x 4 feet

    The Kitchen and Its Negative were made in response to the shadows burnt into the walls in Hiroshima at the time of the bomb. The wooden sculpture, including its interior furniture, was modeled after the artist's own kitchen, which she and an ex-boyfriend were leaving at the time. The steel negative was used to mask the wooden structure while the structure's shadows were burnt into the surface with a roofing torch.

    This was the first sculptural negative that the artist constructed.

    While making this series, the artist also worked on small scale studies of melting glass: domestic objects that had been destroyed by time and circumstance.



    Kitchen: Scorched plywood, copper; Its Negative: Steel
  • The Kitchen and Its Negative

    The Kitchen and Its Negative

    2008
    8 x 12 x 4 feet

    The Kitchen and Its Negative were made in response to the shadows burnt into the walls in Hiroshima at the time of the bomb. The wooden sculpture, including its interior furniture, was modeled after the artist's own kitchen, which she and an ex-boyfriend were leaving at the time. The steel negative was used to mask the wooden structure while the structure's shadows were burnt into the surface with a roofing torch.

    This was the first sculptural negative that the artist constructed.

    While making this series, the artist also worked on small scale studies of melting glass: domestic objects that had been destroyed by time and circumstance.




    Kitchen: Scorched Plywood, copper; Negative: Steel
  • The Stones in the Wall (Ruin I)

    The Stones in the Wall (Ruin I)

    2012
    61 5/8 x 105 ½ inches

    These are photograms made by casting light through ice and composed into a final pictorial arrangement after their exposure and development. This work led also to the artist's work in the Slips and Pushes series.

     



    82 unique silver gelatin photograms from ice, silhouetted
  • Tragic Muse

    Tragic Muse

    2009

    This is a photogram influenced by Sir Joshua Reynolds' painting Sarah Siddons as the Tragic Muse, which Karapetian used to draw at the Huntington Library as a child. The photogram incorporates a digital contact print of the artist herself as well as the performative bodies of her friends, who act as the voices in Siddons' (or Karapetian's) head.



    Unique chromogenic photogram from performance and constructed negative
  • We All Go the Same Way Home

    We All Go the Same Way Home

    2009
    4 ½ x 8 ¼ x 6 ¼ inches

    This is a scale model of the artist's favorite bus stop design in Los Angeles, which appears to her to be like a Modernist frame. The buses in LA are notoriously slow, and the artist imagined herself waiting forever at one of these until death, as she and we all wait for many things in life. The photographs in the bus stop depict the artist at 30 (exterior) and the artist aged to 70 (interior.) The aging process was done by forensic photography specialist.)



    Duratrans prints; aluminum, brass, LEDs, automotive paint, painted plywood plinth
  • Work, 2007

    Work, 2007


    12 x 10 x 10 feet

    Made in consideration of the difference between volumes and their absence, sculpturally and pictorially. Inspired by watching huge crates lowered down onto reclining preparators during an installation of Tom Sachs' work at Gagosian Gallery, Beverly Hills (during which Karapetian also acted as an astronaut in Sachs' Space Program.)

     




  • Yield

    Yield

    2011
    96 x 36 x 44 inches
    Unique chromogenic photogram on rolled aluminum, with rolled steel pole